The famous saying goes: 'Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue and a silver sixpence in her shoe.' We all know the old adage, and we all consider it when planning a wedding, but what does it mean and where did it come from?

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It originated in Victorian times and has to do with the future wellbeing of the couple who are about to exchange vows.

'Something Old' is a way of including your family and friends in your big day, it signifies that you have their support and approval. Some traditions dictate that the bride use an old garter, given to her by a married woman so that the new bride can also enjoy a happy marriage.

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'Something New', as it would imply, looks to the future for the couple, filling it with happiness, success and health. Usually a bride's new item will include her dress, or a new pair of shoes.

'Something Borrowed' gives the bride's family a chance to lend her something for good luck. But she must return it though, otherwise it loses it's good luck! Most brides will borrow a precious family jewel, whether it be earrings or a necklace. The Duchess of Cambridge was allowed to borrow the Queen's 1936 Cartier halo-tiara.

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'Something Blue' (and perhaps the most popular item our favourite item!) is considered a good luck charm for brides as it is represents fidelity and constancy. The tradition began in ancient Israel, where brides would wear a blue ribbon in their hair for such purposes.

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The final part of the rhyme, which is often forgotten about, is the 'sixpence in her shoe'. As expected, this has to do with the couple's wealth in married life. Some brides will stick a coin to the bottom of their shoe, others will place it in their shoe during the ceremony. Although the latter might be a bit uncomfortable, it seems a small price to pay for your future! If you believe that sort of thing...

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